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A straggler from @d20burlesque’s #nvburlesque

A straggler from @d20burlesque’s #nvburlesque

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Happy Fourth of July!

Happy Fourth of July!

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@dccomics blurbed me on the back of Coffin Hill vol. 1

@dccomics blurbed me on the back of Coffin Hill vol. 1

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It’s Free Comic Book Day!

It’s Free Comic Book Day!

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No Superheroes or Zombies: Joe

Keatinge and Leila del Duca

Talk Shutter



In Shutter, their upcoming series for Image Comics, writer Joe Keatinge and artist Leila del Duca set out to create a universe where nothing is off limits — except superheroes and zombies. The series follows Kate Kristopher, a former child adventurer and the last in a long line of explorers, as she tries to live a normal life. For a yet unknown reason, she turned her back on adventure and excitement, preferring to embrace anonymity. But secrets won’t stay hidden and before she knows it, Kate finds herself once again dodging peril and plumbing into the depths of her family’s mysterious past.

With their ambitious new series set for release, Keatinge and del Duca took some time to chat with Paste about their new project, its evolution and diversity in comics.

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1 Notes

Astoria Staple Fatty’s Cafe

Will Reopen in Mid-April


Fatty’s Cafe carved out a niche for itself on Ditmars Blvd., over the last 10 years, but that was disrupted late last year, when their lease expired, forcing them to relocate. “I’m not going to lie and say I don’t feel bad about that,” Fernando says. “It’s very personal. It’s like a child. We basically lost a child last year.” But they soon found a new space on 28th Avenue near 45th Street — which was formerly the restaurant Stove — and it’s more than twice the size of the old Fatty’s. It’s still under construction, but the Peñas hope to see it open by mid-April.

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2 Notes



Mike Mignola and Scott Allie Look

Back on 20 Years of Hellboy


Hellboy has been kicked, punched, clawed and smashed by tentacled beasts. He’s had a nail shoved in his head, a knife thrust in his back and a spear gouged through his chest. He’s killed giants, maimed witches and swung a stone hand like a sledgehammer. He likes pancakes and hates Nazis. He’s the Beast of the Apocalypse, the rightful king of Britain and a current resident of Hell. And that’s just in the character’s first 20 years.

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Rat Queens, Vol. 1:

Sass and Sorcery 
Review



Meet the Rat Queens, a group of foul-mouthed badasses who brawl as hard as they party, and they do both with style. There’s Hannah, the spell-casting hot head; Violet, the beardless warrior dwarf; Dee, a divine sorceress who left the squid-worshipping cult that raised her; and Betty, the cute-as-a-button thief with a penchant for candy and magic mushrooms. Collecting the first five issues of the acclaimed new series, trade paperback Sass and Sorcery is a solid introduction to the group’s raunchy, sword-swinging escapades, and with a comic this fun to read, the larger dose is welcome.

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1 Notes

IT’S 2014 & THERE’S STILL A

BLACKSMITH WORKING IN

CENTRAL PARK


Larry Hagberg looks like a guy who hammers steel for a living. He’s tall with large tattooed arms and a barrel chest. His hair and beard are silver, his hands black with soot. He’s a throwback to a forgone era of ruggedness, not just the kind of guy who has a workshop but one who tightens bolts by hand. He was bending scrolls for the fence at Peter Detmold Park in Midtown when I visited his workshop.

Read the interview here…

1 Notes

image


Monster & Madman
 #1 by Steve

Niles and Damien Worm Review



The driving force behind comics — that burning “What if…?” — is alive and well inMonster & Madman, a gothic miniseries that envisions a chance encounter between Dr. Frankenstein’s ill-conceived creation and Jack the Ripper. Character mash-ups like these can be fun (Cowboys & Aliens), or weird and gimmicky (Scooby Doo meets Sonny and Cher), but these two characters are a perfect match. The Creature, reviled for his grotesquery, longs for acceptance and the Ripper, truly a ghoul, passes unnoticed amid society. Arguably, it’s fiction’s first monster and real life’s first modern serial killer.

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